What’s the purpose of the phrase ‘Chinese virus’?

Instead of calming fears resulting from the pandemic that has infected almost 36,000 Americans and left more than 400 dead, Trump has renamed the Coronavirus calling it the “Chinese virus” at a briefing on Monday. This has not gone unnoticed in the media and among the citizens who now thrown hate speech and intimidate Chinese-American for bringing the virus to the United States

The question, though, is, is the president right for called the Coronavirus the Chinese virus, or is he employing his usual tactics to cover up his failures for not appropriately managing the virus spread despite knowing ahead of time the destruction rate?

While some tag the president as racist and wrong, the GOPs have added other synonyms including calling it the “Wuhan Virus” and boldly claiming the president was right as the virus did originate from China and accusing critics of spreading fake news as usual.

Regardless of his utterances, WHO has cautioned using languages that put a group of people at risk of racial profiling, which can be seen, as the number of hate crimes against Asians, especially Chinese on the rise. This is also dangerous as it could hinder effectively tackling the pandemic in the country. 

What are we missing?

Trump claims that tagging the Coronavirus the Chinese virus is to ensure that China takes responsibility for their action of the damage and deaths the virus has caused, others think, the president is just looking for someone to blame for his inability to properly manage the pandemic in the United States leaving most Americans vulnerable to a virus that could be nipped in the bud.

Trump is known for racist comments; from calling Mexican rapists and using other derogatory terms to describe people other than Americans, it is something we are used to. Whether it is used as political leverage or otherwise, it is still wrong to call it the Chinese virus.

Other opinions

Historians say the phrase is part of Americans’ continuous habit of blaming others, especially people of Asian origin for epidemics over the century. However, this is what others have to say about the phrase.

Chris Hayes, the host of MSNBC thinks the presidency is using it t create a distraction from his failure to properly manage the virus in the US.

Fox News Anchor Brian Kilmeade supports the president, saying, it is good to acknowledge the origin and hold the Chinese accountable for failing to inform the rest of the world of the virus. We are not surprised about this, though.

Former Trump’s campaign manager, as reported by Graeme Wood of The Atlantic says Trump only knows how to fight dirty using terms as such. It is his natural habitat.

An Editorial in the National Review says while it is right to blame the Chinese for their lackadaisical attitude to the virus, stigmatizing a race is grossly incorrect.

At the end of it all, China has always been the punching bag for the president, from the trade war to the Chinese virus. The only bad side is most Republicans are always trying to support the president even when he is outrightly incorrect.

The fear of the unknown, whether it is people, culture, or language, is the Achilles heel of Americans. Hence their quick reaction to throw blames in adversity.